Archives for category: startups

Here’s a x-posting from our sister site Angel Academe

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It barely seems believable but this week we launched the fourth year of Entrepreneur Academe – the mentoring programme we run for female founders of tech or tech-enabled start ups. This year we’ve shaken things up a little and instead of following a cohort over several months instead we’ll be inviting different companies to join us each month, in order to see as wide a range of businesses as possible. But each month will consider the same issues, focussing on investment readiness.

A fine  – and diverse – array of businesses were in attendance at this inaugural session:

  • Channeliser is an online network enabling companies to search, connect and engage with prospective IT partners anywhere in the world.
  • Doobiz is a mobile app for contact sharing (using a contact-over-audio technology) and realtime business networking.
  • PsychApps is an app which helps to diagnose, track and journal mental illness, as well as discretely connecting users to local professional therapists.
  • SoSensational is a fashion and beauty e-commerce site curated and tailored to the needs of women over 50.
  • Talking Circles is an enterprise platform for promoting connectivity and continuous learning between coworkers in medium to large organizations.
  • Trik is a drone data management software for vertical structure inspection, assisting drone pilots in data collection, visualisation and analysis.
  • Wattl is a video social network providing users with a grid of heatmapped content which is popular and trending.
  • Worktu connects schools with local teachers online at via their a job-posting website, connecting with local teaching talent at a more affordable price than traditional recruitment agencies.

Sarah kicked off the afternoon with an introduction to the Angel Academe suite of offerings, before asking the entrepreneurs to introduce themselves and pitch their businesses – which everyone did with great verve and passion.

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The first half of the afternoon’s mentoring proper was a panel Q&A and general group discussion. We were honuored to have a great group of panellists kick off:

  • Francesca Tondi (Angel Investor)
  • Jessica Dick (Synergy Growth)
  • Natasha Jacobs (Craigie Capital)
  • Audrey Mandela (Tech Entrepreneur & Angel Investor)
  • Karen Thomas-Bland (Angel Investor)

We then explored lots of the issues raised in small groups under the headings: The right kind of funding for you – and the right kind of funder; Organising your campaign: prep, networking, pitching, tax & legals; and Valuation – what are you prepared to give up? We covered far too ground to go into too much detail here, but here are some of the headlines from each group:

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The right kind of funder

  • Go for smart money – investors who can contribute much more than simple cash.
  • Investors love to see entrepreneurs who have put their own money into a business – the ultimate skin in the game.
  • That said – don’t wait too long to start fundraising – investors also want to see ambition.
  • Try to find investors who will most likely follow on.
  • Use the “network effect” of your investors.
  • Remember that fundraising is almost always a long process – longer than you anticipate. (A rule of thumb here is 3-6 months.) So don’t wait until you’re out of runway until you raise! And expect to be juggling fundraising and building the business a lot of the time.

Valuation

  • Every round you do you need to re-justify your valuation (can you really scale it? does this valuation make it worth it to investors?)
  • You run the risk of a down round in future rounds if you aren’t able to deliver on what you said you could do.Gauge your expectations to your investors and judge what is really needed for your business.
  • Consider the exit options: not everyone has to IPO, in fact very few do – a trade sale is what happens to most companies. Also, what are your own goals?
  • You can also set a valuation as a range and work it through with your investor.

Organising your campaign

  • Terms sheets – ideally you should have the same term sheets for all investors in a round, although if there are different types of investors, eg angels and VC or an investor/director, this may not be possible.
  • Be prepared with your own term sheet to present to investors although some, particularly VCs will bring their own.
  • EMI option pools will dilute investors,  make sure your investors are aware of this.
  • Have a full pitch deck which can be adapted to different situations, eg lengthened or shortened, less text for face to face presentations, more text for a deck that is emailed.
  • Open your pitch with a “spear to the head” blow.  Make yourself stand out!
  • A good pitch creates an emotional connection to the listener, tells the story of the problem and your solution and why you and your team can address this issue.
  • Always mention competition; everyone has some! Where do you position yourself against your competitors?
  • Keep your pitch as simple and as easy to quickly understand as possible.
  • Make sure your pitch matches your social media profile, eg Linkedin!

Lots to mull over there; if you’ve got anything to add we’d love to hear from you. And in the meantime, if you’d like to enter your company in the next session, you can do so here. Finally, many thanks to Bob Mollen of Fried Frank for hosting the afternoon. More next month!

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From the Angel Academe blog:

Angel Academe advisor and highly experienced angel investor Meganne Houghton-Berry gave the keynote at our Entrepreneur Academe 2016 graduation ceremony last week. Here’s the outline of her talk.

More here.

For so many reasons, 2015 was a watershed year for Turner Hopkins. It’s certainly been an enormously busy one, and one inevitable consequence of that has been that we’ve not been posting here as regularly as we’d previously done. A couple of years back we might have panicked a little about that; after all, a strong social media presence and an active blog are surely part of the toolkit for self-respecting digital media specialists, right? Too true, but we’ve come to cut ourselves a little slack on the issue, and accepted that living through interesting times often means you don’t have much time – or energy – to write about them. We’ve also been spending more time communicating through our newsletters – which if nothing else puts us on-trend! Anyway, enough post-rationalising, and on with the review.

It’ll be more than apparent to regular visitors here that Angel Academe, in all its guises, has been the dominant force in our lives for the last year. Here’s the 2015 round-up Sarah included in her most recent AA newsletter:

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Wow, what a year! We’ve made 7 investments with several other deals in the pipeline. The amount raised so far this year is nearly double our 2014 total and from double the number of investors. Many of the women and men investing were making their first angel investment, so congratulations to them as well as everyone else taking part. 

We received and reviewed well over 500 applications to pitch to us this year from a very wide range of women-led technology businesses: from big data to healthtech, fintech and ecommerce. Of these, 15 passed our 3-stage screening process and then pitched at one of our “Studio” events attended by more than 80 angelinvestors over the course of the year.

We also ran 2 Investor Academe sessions, our half day investing workshops, with 25 of our angels as well as bite-sized Tax and Legal Academes prior to the last 2 Studio events.

Our second Entrepreneur Academe cohort has just graduated, taking the number of women founders we’ve mentored to over 50. We ran 12 mentoring sessions this year and, now that the City of London has confirmed sponsorship for next year, we’re in planning mode for 2016. 

In the summer we were honoured to received the UKBAA’s Angel Syndicate of the Year and last month we picked up Funder of the Year in the TechCities Awards.

But it’s not all been about Angel Academe, as we continued our broader-based strategic work for a range of both new and returning clients. Here are some highlights.

The BBC Academy invited Simon to curate two whole days of workshops for the organisation’s leadership, looking at various aspects of the digital landscape. We took on a pretty wide perspective, looking at issues as diverse as managing teams through disruption, “intrapreneurship”, new ways of conceiving and delivering concepts and the role of data in content personalisation and recommendation. We were particularly pleased to able to draw on our wider network to bring new faces into to the BBC, including Friday’s Anno Mitchell, Ramona Liberoff and Abundance Generation’s Louise Wilson. Our thanks to everyone who gave up their timely freely to make these days so successful.

As part of the sessions, Simon delivered a two-hour masterclass looking at his pet topic of the last few years (one which he’s since reprised for the BBC College of Journalism): how to become more personally and professionally effective in the face of potentially constant digital distraction. The sessions mixed theory with practical application and were of course highly interactive, and it’s fascinating to see the degree to which many highly experienced, capable and often brilliant people are really struggling to avoid distraction in their work.

We continued our ongoing relationships with several governmental groups, including UKTI, Innovate UK and the KTN, with work ranging from inward investment to funding competition design and general research. And of course, we continued to work with various other areas of the BBC, including the Market Engagement Team, for whom we delivered a set of detailed case studies.

We were also delighted to hook up with a couple of old friends and former colleagues.

Simon and Marc Jaffrey, OBE, worked together a decade and a half back at the BBC. A genuine polymath, Marc is currently consulting on a fascinating project running in our home town of Brighton and Hove. Our Future City is looking at the impact of education and the arts on young people in the city and kicked off the year with a series of workshops mapping out the terrain. Marc asked Simon to come along and provide a “provocation”; the result was a 20-minute tirade outlining his worries about young people and technology. You can read Simon’s presentation in full here – if nothing else it really was a provocation. In any case, we’re delighted to say that we’re continuing to work on the programme in 2106.

It was also good to be working once again with the pioneering British internet outfit state51, on whose behalf Simon attended Forum Europe‘s Future of Digital Content and Services conference in Brussels.

We’ve read a lot between us over the year, but a handful of books stand out with regard to digital technology:

We continue to get most of our news from two principal sources (ones with mercifully international perspectives): The Economist and The BBC World Service. But of course the podcast continues its inexorable rise and rise and several have been mainstays for us over the last year, including:

And finally, cultural highlights of the year have included Britten’s The Rape of Lucretia at Glyndebourne, Brecht and Weill’s Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny at the ROH, Purcell’s Indian Queen at the ENO, and three standout visual art shows: Magnificent Obsessions a the Barbican, The World Goes Pop at the Tate and Joseph Cornell – Wanderlust at the V&A. And we’ve been delighted to witness the thriving of Jazz in the Round, the monthly show put on at the Cockpit in Marylebone by our good friends at Jazz on 3.

So that’s been our 2015. We wish everyone a thriving, prosperous 2016 and look forward to seeing many of you throughout the year.

Sarah and Simon

 

 

Here’s a x-post from my own personal blog DGMFS. Quite a lot of stuff in here about the SF tech scene so well worth a listen.

From YouTube: “This episode of The Random Show is a mind snack… fueled by wine. There are dozens of topics covered in this bromantic session of scatterbrained nonsense.”

 

I said I’d be putting some stuff in here that was strictly speaking outside our normal ambit, but Ferriss has had a huge influence on me and this is a hoot. Among the entertaining stuff there’s some genuinely thought-provoking discussion on the San Francisco tech scene and a possible tech bubble around 29.30. For what it’s worth, I’ve had a similar premonition for some time, and this excellent New Statesman piece on Amazon’s potential decline has only served to amplify that. (Thanks to The Planner author Tom Campbell for the link on that one.)

Simon

Last Monday (June 9th) saw the 6th BBC Online Briefing, outlining the organisation’s digital activity for external stakeholders and suppliers. I was lucky enough to be asked along again so as ever, I thought I’d report back (and, yes, it’s taken a week but what can I say, we’ve been busy).

Once again we were in the BBC’s storied Radio Theatre, and the event was hosted by the thoroughly charming Fiona Bruce, who seemed to be relishing this second appearance and generally got under the skin of the discussions more than last time (sometimes provocatively so, but we’ll get to that later).

BBC Online’s current priorities – BBC iPlayer, myBBC, innovation at scale, “the BBC, online” and continuous delivery  – were emblazoned on a banner by the side of the stage and in his opening key note,  BBC Future Media Director Ralph Rivera outlined these through a series of concrete examples from across “the products”, including:

  • the roll out of the Knowledge and Learning “iWonder” guides (a huge task involving the consolidation of material from over 200 existing sites)
  • long-form journalism in News (in which I gather our good friend Paul Finn of Fitzroy and Finn had a major part in designing)
  • the new iPlayer, launched in BETA in March
  • the re-tooling of “below the waterline” features such as metadata ingest
  • the ongoing development of Playlister
  • ditto with BBC Live, which will give, over the summer, “the Olympic experience” to Wimbledon, Glastonbury, the Commonwealth Games and of course the World Cup, which I gather is happening as I write

Ralph went on the discuss the importance of working with external companies. He admitted that it was still difficult for outsiders to work with the organisation, but that the development of the new roster, broken into Testing, Design and Services, was hopefully going to be a big step in improving things. He also pointed out that the external quota is “a floor, not a ceiling”; the impressive fact that last year’s external spend in digital was 30% – around £19.5 million) suggests that this is more than just rhetoric.

Robin Cramp was up next, talking though Connected Studio‘s work over the last six months (much of which, of course, we’ve reported on this blog). Robin first introduced Matt Shearer, from BBC News Labs and Chris Rush, of the agency Realise who talked us through Referend-erm, an interactive hub about the upcoming Scottish independence referendum, aimed at 16-24 year olds, where “no question is to big, to small or too stupid to ask”. I was pleased to see that the team had opted to to create an app but rather a mobile-first, fully responsive website. Matt described the work as a “speedboat project” – enabling the the team to build something outside the organisation’s usual roadmap.

Robin was joined by CS Head Adrian Woolard. The two talked through upcoming CS projects, which would include working with the Natural History on their next behemoth series, One Planet, as well as with Radio 3, building on the work already done around classical music, and the World Service. Adrian also discussed a project encouraging coding for teenagers and hinted at a new platform to enable “innovation at scale” – but couldn’t say what it was jut yet…

John Page from R&D then presented a range of work that showed just how BBC R&D was “at the heart of reinventing our industry”, looking ahead in time frames of 3, 5 and 10 years. “Broadcast as a system” had traditionally been Create>>Deliver>>Consume, but several factors were disrupting the model, including end-to-end IP, data-centrism and new devices and interfaces. R&D are currently responding to these shifts by concentrating on projects that are:

  • immersive (a project using Oculus Rift and binaural sound to present chamber performances by members of the BBC Symphony Orchestra)
  • data-centric (overlays on sports event)
  • interactive/personal/adaptive (personalised sound mixing of live events)

John also discussed the importance of collaboration with outside agencies including tech manufacturers, SMEs, digital agencies (I was pleased to see that they’ve been working with my old firm Somethin’ Else) and academia.

The final presentation of the first half came from Carmen Aitken from BBC Audiences, who came to talk not about “the death of TV” – but rather its future, based on various in-depth audience research methods. TV, however it’s consumed, continues to satisfy four key needs: sociability, sensory stimulation, synchrony and relaxation. Interestingly, research shows that most viewers generally know what they want to watch, and find it via EPG, PVR and VOD – very much in that order. As for those of us who have given up on the TV as a device entirely – well, we are still very much outliers, although it’s worth noting that we tend to use laptops to do so rather than tablets.

Carmen posited three scenarios for the future of TV, using car-based metaphors:

  • Flying Cars model – a completely disrupted landscape
  • Horse and cart model – business as usual
  • Modified car model – some hybrid of the present and new forms of consumption

She made a cogent argument for the likelihood of the last one, of course. I personally emain unconvinced, and, as I’ve said before, when thinking about the future of media generally, we’d all do well to think about Nasseem Taleb’s “turkey graph“.

After a brief break, the stage was taken by polymath Dave Birss, who’d been asked to think about what he would do if given a digital-only network to run (one couldn’t help but think of BBC Three here, but that was never made explicit). Dave set out to test a series of assumptions, in each case taking them part fairly comprehensively. These included:

  • Assumption – “The success of a programme = the number of viewers.” Dave – why couldn’t we use the number of interactions as a success measure? Wouldn’t this tell us more about how an audience really felt?
  • Assumption: “We make programmes for people sitting on the settee.” Dave – really? Tech gives us the ability to make location-based, context-appropriate content.
  • Assumption: – “Digital stuff should be an extension of TV content.” Dave – why not start “in the real world”? What about “player-written drama” or “social-guided programming”?
  • Assumption: “Content needs to be edited to fixed lengths.” Dave – why not have expandable content”, content which might initially appear as a 3 minute stub, which might expand to 90 minutes if the viewer wanted to see, say, a whole interview.

This last point was the most compelling for me, but interestingly it’s where Fiona Bruce came in, making the observation that from her experience, lengthy, un-edited interviews led to “crapitude”. Well, I think it’s a question of intention: if you go into an interview knowing that you can fix things in the edit there’s no real jeopardy – no incentive to make a good long-from interview. But speaking as podcast junkie, I have to say that the scene is pretty inspiring – and I rarely, if ever, come across a dud. (Note that Dubner & Levitt and are doing the rounds at the moment, promoting Think Like A Freak; most of what I’ve heard on the radio so far has been soundbyte-y, but not this fabulous hour-long conversation on the Tim Ferriss podcast. Most definitely not an example of crapitude.)

The session was rounded off with a Q&A with Ralph and Matthew Postgate, Controller of R&D. Questions covered included:

  • What tech gets you most excited? Matthew – broadcasting data sets and the Internet of Things; Ralph – truly interactive, immersive video.
  • What the role of UGC? Ralph – something we can draw on, but not our core mission nor a strength; “we are the signal in the noise”.
  • What are the key qualities you’re looking for in a collaborator:P Ralph – creativity, diversity, a focus on delivery – and tenacity.
  • Will the licence renewal process affect innovation? Matthew – yes, but positively, driving innovation in areas like personalisation.

Once again, it was a thoroughly engaging afternoon, and a revealing one two. Congratulations to all involved and I look forward to the next one…

Simon

After our competition briefing in London on May 6th, we hit the road as ever, taking a stripped-down version of the briefing to Manchester and then on to Bristol. We were, again, talking everyone through two current Creative Industries funding competitions: Innovation in location-based services and Enhancing the value of interactions with digital content.

We did Manchester on the morning of May 8th, in the splendid Museum of Science and Industry. As in London the TSB’s Lech Rzedzicki and Tom Fiddian walked us through the EVIDC and LBS services in detail, before taking questions from the audience, along with Matt Brown. As ever, the questions ranged from the straightforward and technical (Is this single stage? – Yes. Can a Catalpult be a consortium partner? Yes – but not funded… etc) – to the more challenging (Can you give a %age of successful applications? Not really, varies from call to call).

We had a very informative case study from Dennis Kehoe, CEO of Cloud computing specialists AIMES Grids Services, who’ve received several rounds of TSB funding. Dennis’ key points included:

  • You do have to invest time and effort in this process
  • Collaboration – share the risk of innovation
  • But get collaboration agreements in place
  • Don’t do it for the money!
  • Don’t reverse engineer the call
  • Timescales are rigorously applied
  • Don’t over stretch your cashflow
  • Feedback is key
  • You do get better at this stuff!
  • Allow something like 15% for project management

Dennis then joined the KTN’s Rachel Jones, Lech and Tom for a panel discussion which I chaired. Dennis had used the wonderful line “We are all Pavlovian Dogs”*, so I kicked off with a question on the disturbing ubiquity of advertising and branding around online content. The conversation, spurred on by the audience, went on to cover the user-centred design approach, the difficulty of combining Agile methods of project management with TSB “process”, and ways in which users might start to take back control of their data.

The next day, Friday, we finished off in Bristol with a morning session at the Watershed**. The pre-break format was much the same, and was followed by a case study from Paul Appleby, formerly of the BBC and now CEO of VID Communications. Paul’s tips included:

  • Read the application very carefully
  • Establish the potential value of the bid
  • Use the language of the application
  • Get clarity on roles, especially on “who has nagging rights”
  • Avoid “Spreadsheet  Romanticism”*
  • Establish lead roles: PM, tech lead, UX lead
  • Get a central document store together
  • Get routine meetings in the diary
  • Stay in scope!
  • Keep your Monitoring Officer informed of potential changes of direction
  • Define and montor deliverables
  • Take your time on the application
  • The consortium needs history

We finished the morning, of course, with a panel discussion of the usual suspects, plus Jo Reid, of local company Calvium and Andy Proctor, Lead Technologist for Satellite Navigation at the TSB – all ably chaired by Rachel. Interestingly, of all the three discussion we had this was the most caught up on TSB process, but all in all it was a lively session and great to get fresh insight from Joe and

So, all done for now! As ever, thanks to the KTN’s Anita Onwuegbuzie for making the whole thing run so smoothly; and to Rachel, Tom, Lech and Matt for good company along the way.

* I’m seriously thinking that “We Are All Pavlovian Dogs” by Spreadsheet Romantics has to be my next music project, a kind of early 80s agit-pop pastiche. Or maybe not.

** The Watershed is also home to the Pervasive Media Studio, which I’d not previously seen. Thanks to Mark Leaver who showed me round during a break in the day’s proceedings.

Simon

Thank you all for coming along on Tuesday night and making the event such a success.

Particular thanks to our speakers: Bob Schukai from Thomson Reuters, Hannah O’Shaunessey and Kerri Mckechnie from Angel Academe, Sarah Tierney from We Are Colony and Louise Wilson from Abundance. I’m sure we’ll be hearing a lot more from all of them in future.

Kerri talked about Entrepreneur Academe, the 12-month mentoring programme for ambitious women entrepreneurs that we’re running in partnership with the City of London. The programme kicked off last month and you can read about it and our winning entrepreneurs here.

We have an amazing ling-up of mentors and experts but are always looking to add more. If you’d like to get involved, please tell us a little about yourself here.

Finally, if you’d like to find out more about angel investing opportunities, please drop us a line and if you’d like to be considered for a pitching slot at one of our events, please send an investor summary or pitch deck for us to review.

Sarah

Tuesday was a busy (and long) one, then. We kicked off in Kings Place in the morning with the TSB briefing then started all over again in the same room that afternoon with the launch of the TSB’s Digital Strategy for the coming period.

The afternoon was introduced and generally hosted by Frank Boyd, one of the directors of the newly formed Knowledge Transfer Network, who briefly talked us through the KTN’s work before handing over to the TSB’s Head of Digital, Nick Appleyard who presented the organisation’s current and upcoming position on the digital industries. Some headlines, then:

  • The stakeholders in the digital space the TSB seeks to link up are the development or tech community and the businesses on whom an impact has been made by digital. The latter group often struggles to understand digital but the former group, as steeped in it as they are, struggle to find a route to market.
  • The TSB achieves this “joining up” with its IC Tomorrow team and via the KTN.
  • The principal elements of the idea cycle are conception, IP, business models and technology. But all too often the missing piece is the user.
  • So the TSB really seeks to fund projects that are user- and market-led.
  • UK is a great place to build digital technology businesses because of users’ expectations and behaviour: we’re Europe’s leaders in online and mobile penetration and the world’s leaders in terms of online transaction.
  • The TSB has launched the Connected Digital Economy Catapult in order to provide a platform and tools to help tech SME’s reach new markets.
  • Collaboration is hugely important to the TSB, and current partners include Nesta, ESRC, Creative Skillset, UKTI, and on and on…

Nick handed over to KTN’s CEO Chris Warkup whose opening remark struck a chord in the room: that the UK is great at innovation but not so good at the exploitation of new ideas. He then talked us how the new KTN was going to work. Here are some headlines:

  • The new company merges 14 previous KTNs.
  • Knowledge Transfer isn’t something that can simply be conducted virtually; rather, it’s a “contact sport”.
  • Often businesses have lots of information and knowledge to hand, but can lack wisdom.
  • The KTN seeks to drive cross-sector collaboration, join up business, technologists and funders, build multi-disciplinary teams and help the TSB in ths scoping of competitions.
  • He ended with a line of Matt Ridley’s, which I’ll paraphrase: “The future’s most limiting resource won’t be water or oil, but good brains.” (Matt, of course, is, in his own terms, a rational optimist; being rather more of a glass half full guy when it comes to civilisational development I think I’m rather more with Jared “Collapse” Diamond on the lack of water front, but still, I take his point.)

Chris was followed by the first of two talks from companies who’d received TSB funding. Jeff Clifford and Graham Jack represented Double Negative, the largest visual effects company in Europe, and often in the world. They discussed the huge changes in their field over the last decade, with the requirement for CG increasing dramatically – a real headache both in terms of logistics and the use of artists’ time. They went on to illustrate their work with a showreel of scenes from the upcoming Thor 2, which showed pre-VFX shots with finished ones; they were, of course, barely recognisable from each other.

They went on to say how innovation in workflow was absolutely essential for them, and that’s where they’d focussed for their TSB-funding work. SIM, a project run in collaboration with FilmLight and Surrey University sought to address these issues, and a project about to start is ASAP : a Scalable Architecture of Production.

Next up was Pilgrim Beart, founder of AlertMe.com, and the chief architect of Hyper/Cat, a TSB-funded project looking to create interoperability standards to join different verticals all working in the Internet of Things space. He opened with the fascinating observation that as the number of connected devices on the planet grew to outnumber, vastly, the number of people, then devices were going to have to start “looking after themselves”. And what was getting in the way of the IoT actually happening? Interoperability between verticals.

So Hyper/Cat sought to crack the problem, or at least examine how it might be cracked down the line, with a multi-party demonstrator. The outcome had plainly been successful, and Pilgrim outlined the chief drivers of its success:

  • Learning by doing
  • Strong relationships
  • An early market
  • The development of a process for coming up with a spec
  • Global potential – the UK can truly lead here.

He finished with the observation that in 10 years the very term Internet of Things would be long gone; we’ll simply talking about “The Internet”.

The day ended with a panel discussion on the challenges facing digital innovators, hosted by Jon Kingsbury, currently at Nesta but about to come over to the KTN as Head of Digital Economy. Jon was joined by Allesandro Guazzi of Sentimoto, who are developing smart wearables for older people; Emer Coleman of TransportAPI, who make apps based on public data made available through APIs; and Databarta’s Jane Lucy, a specialist in the use of digital media to deliver campaigning. The panel took questions from the floor and debated a range of issues, including:

  • The desperate lack of tech talent, especially devs and most especially Ruby devs.
  • The importance of the engagement with Europe and the Horizon 20/20 project.
  • The difficulty of actually doing x-disciplinary collaboration.
  • The value of mentoring.
  • The importance of “social”.

Jon put a final question to the panel: what could the TSB do to improve the situation. Three answers came through loud and clear: skills development; help finding the right collaborators; and a push for open data standards.

It was a nice, sparky ending to a generally lively and hugely informative afternoon.

Simon

Zoe Cunningham writes in Computer Weekly:

So my dream of becoming the next Deborah Meaden remained just that – a dream – until a chance meeting with Sarah Turner. Sarah set up Angel Academe in 2012 to be an angel investing group, with a difference. It’s not easy to tie down the statistics on angel investing as a lot of it happens informally but the best statistics that we have (from the UK Business Angels Association) show that just 5% of angel investors are female.

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Zoe Cunningham writes over on the Angel Academe blog:

I’ve written before on the lack of women in technology roles. There are many many articles that talk about the small number of women in top positions in large corporates. The modestly targeted 30% club is still a long way from its goal to get just 30% of board positions filled with females.

Yet compared with the number of women acting as angel investors, these areas are awash with women. It’s not easy to tie down the statistics on angel investing as a lot of it happens informally – a chap knows a chap and lends him a couple of hundred thousand. However what statistics exist show a dearth of women. The UK Business Angels Association do an annual survey of their members and have found that a mere 5% of angel investors are female.

More at Angel Academe